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35 phrases of Benito Pérez Galdós

35 phrases of Benito Pérez Galdós

Benito Pérez Galdós (1843 - 1920) was a prolific Spanish novelist, playwright and chronicler. He published up to 31 novels, 46 National Episodes, 23 plays and the equivalent of 20 volumes of shorter fiction, journalism and other writings.

He is recognized worldwide as one of the main representatives of the 19th century realistic novel and one of the most important writers in the Spanish language.

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Famous quotes by Benito Pérez Galdós

I am not to blame for life being nourished by virtue and sin, the beautiful and the ugly.

More days there are sausages.

Fear is the form of our subordination to physical laws.

There is no happiness that does not have a but.

A train that leaves is the thing in the world more like a book that ends.

Laws are not dictated to love.

Isn't it sad to consider that only misfortune makes men brothers?

Our imagination is what sees and not the eyes.

Crying in great souls is not improper, rather it indicates the fruitful consortium of delicacy in feelings with the energy of character.

Political morality is like a layer with so many patches, it is not known what the primitive cloth is.

however much it may be said, the artist may be more or less hidden, but never disappears, nor have the altarpieces just hidden, no matter how well they are built.

The blind would be happy in this country, which for the tongue is paradise and for the eyes hell

The one who lives without knowing wants to know more than the one who wants to know without living

In my savage independence I carry within a spiritual light that makes my life pleasant and pleasant.

It was a nest, a make-up of politicians, journalists, grandstands, agitators, ministers, and it was a pleasure to see how much the chicks were broken by the shell.

Sea where thought navigates at will without ever reaching any shore.

It may well be said that strategy, and force and tactics, which are human things, can never and will never be against enthusiasm, which is divine.

It is scary to think that perhaps the most sincere admirations we have are those of people who have not understood us.

Yes, one thing I know, and we know nothing more than superficial phenomena ...

True love, solid and durable, is born from the deal; the rest is the invention of poets, musicians and other lazy people.

Love is an art that is never learned and always known.

Geology had lost a stone and society had won a man.

Blessed is he who likes the sweetness of work without being his slave.

Just as the clearing of the day is born from night, freedom is born from oppression.

Evil, in whatever form it takes within the human, has no meaning for a strong, plumb and self-confident soul.

Are we born to work like animals?

To live is to relate, enjoy and suffer, desire, hate and love. Reading is artificial and borrowed life, the usufruct, through a brain function, of the ideas and feelings of others, the acquisition of the treasures of human truth by purchase or by fraud, not by work. Do not.

Let each one follow his inclination, because the inclinations are usually stripes or tracks drawn by a very high finger, and no one, however much he knows, knows more than fate.

That moth of the will we call pity.

Experience is a flame that does not shine but burns.

It is scary to think that perhaps the most sincere admirations we have are those of people who have not understood us.

The money is earned by all those who with patience and fine observation go after those who lose it.

Much has been declared against the positivism of cities, plague that between the galas and the splendor of culture corrodes the moral foundations of society; but there is a more terrible plague, and it is the positivism of the villages, which petrifies millions of beings, killing in them all noble ambition and enclosing them in the circle of a mechanical, brutal and dark existence.

I am so happy, that sometimes it seems to me that I live suspended in the air, that my feet do not touch the earth, that I smell eternity and breathe the air that blows beyond the sun. I do not sleep. I don't need to sleep!

Much has been declared against the positivism of cities, plague that between the galas and the splendor of culture corrodes the moral foundations of society; but there is a more terrible plague, and it is the positivism of the villages, which petrifies millions of beings, killing in them all noble ambition and enclosing them in the circle of a mechanical, brutal and dark existence.

The two parties that have agreed to turn peacefully in power, are two herds of men who aspire only to graze in the budget. They lack ideals, no high purpose moves them, they will not improve in the least the living conditions of this unfortunate poor and illiterate race. They will pass one after the other, leaving everything as it is today, and will take Spain to a state of consumption that will have to end in death. They will not undertake neither the religious problem, nor the economic one, nor the educational one; they will not do more than pure bureaucracy, caciquismo, sterile work of recommendations, favors to the friends, to legislate without any practical efficacy, and ahead with the lanterns…